The Minecraft Diaries 13: Projects completed, and further adventures

The A-frame house at my spawn point.

The A-frame house at my spawn point.

I finished the alpine A-frame, and it looks great! I also built a road between Mountain View and the alpine house, though it isn’t really finished; I’d like to border it with stone brick. I flattened the area in front of the alpine house but I haven’t made a garden yet. There are only two kinds of flowers, anyway. 

I also went back to the desert temple, finished digging it out, and made a sandstone plaza for it. I need to finish that, too. I got bored with all that sand. I seem to excel at starting projects and then not quite finishing them.

The Desert Temple.

The Desert Temple.

I built a little barn, to keep extra wheat and seeds and eggs, and a bed for when I’m caught out there at night. I wanted to make it out of red wool, so it’s like a proper barn, but people say it’s not a good idea to make buildings out of wool, and it was too bulky to put it outside a layer of cobble. I might try again anyway. I wish we could paint wood.

I also made the tower nicer on the Mountain View house. Then I got really itchy feet, dropped everything, and went traveling!

I went north again, thinking I’d look for the jungle ravine and see if there was anything good down there. I also needed more leather for books so I could make an enchantment table, now that I have obsidian from the lava pool under the alpine house. Instead I somehow missed the jungle entirely and ended up going past some little islands further north and into plains and swamps. Just past that area there were more extreme hills, and I considered settling down there. It was really nice, had a good variety of animals and lots of surface iron and coal, which for some reason makes me think there would be rich mining there (I’m probably thinking too geologically, though; that might make sense on Earth, but not necessarily in Minecraft world). I was looking at a nice little island with a heap of a hill on it, and I thought maybe I would try to build a Victorian mansion there. It would be more secure than Mountain View, with a natural moat. Maybe I could make a drawbridge, or at least a couple of docks for boats.

But I always want to go a little further….

There was a huge desert beyond that, with no temple or anything that I could see; and then past that, on one side was a jungle and then plains next to that. For some reason I stopped at the place where these three biomes come together, and I chopped down a jungle tree – they can be massive, with four-block trunks that are three or four times as high as spruce or oak – and built a little cabin on a beach beside a lagoon. Next morning I opened the door and looked around, wondering why I had stopped there. And then I saw it: a village!

Desert Village (I need a new naming convention), from the top of the tower.

Desert Village (I need a new naming convention), from the top of the tower.

It’s medium-sized, not big enough for its own iron golem, but it does have a librarian, a blacksmith, a butcher, and a priest, as well as lots of farmers. Trading!

I looked up what you’re supposed to do with a village, having heard somewhere about zombie sieges, and got to work lighting the entire area and then laboriously fencing it in. I spent a couple of nights on top of the church tower, the tallest structure in town, shooting any mobs I could see from there and running down whenever I heard a zombie pounding on a door. I hate that sound, it’s incredibly realistic. There were so many hostile mobs. They scare the crap out of me, especially those damned creepers. I’m starting to be afraid of the dark in real life.

The Testificates.

The Testificates.

I don’t know what the villagers think of me. As far as I can tell, the offers they make for trades haven’t improved at all since I arrived and started to protect them. I don’t know how else to tell. But it’s nice to have other beings around, even though the “testificates,” as they were originally called, are a dour and taciturn people. If you stand in front of one for a while, he will stare back at you with his green eyes and, every so often, nod. It’s friendly enough. But they’re not exactly chatty.

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